Psychological Types (1923) by Jung, Carl Gustav [Psychology]

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LectorRecitator
Posts: 73
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » January 2nd, 2019, 3:58 pm

Happy New Year Everybody. Wishes For A Peaceful And Productive 2019

Preface

"Jung was a tremendously insightful clinician" (Jordan Peterson)

"Jung was on a giant scale…he was a master physician of the soul in his insights, a profound sage in his conclusions. He is also one of Western Man’s great liberators." (J. B. Priestly)

"Jung can sometimes rise to the heights of a Blake or a Nietzsche or a Kierkegaard…like any true prophet or artist, he extended the range of the human imagination…to be able to share Jungian emotions is surely an almost necessary capacity of the free mind." (Philip Toynbee)

"I haven't read anyone that I regard as deeper as Jung" (Jordan Peterson)

Details

∙ Title: Psychological Types or The Psychology Of Individuation
∙ Author/Editor: Jung, Carl Gustav (1875–1961)
∙ Translator: Baynes, Helton Godwin (1882–1943)
∙ Publisher: Kegan Paul, Trench,Trubner & Company, L.T.D.
∙ Date/Edition/Impression: © 1923

Description

One of the most groundbreaking works in the field of psychology, which established such terms as introvert and extrovert.
Jung defined four main types from his observations of patients, friends and colleagues: Thinking, Feeling, Sensation and Intuition.

"The great value of the present work lies in the fact that it is a mature and conscious survey of the psychological field, viewed by a mind of unique
range and development whose astonishing wealth of psychological experience illumines the whole work. The range of Jung’s thought has developed with his experience. The Psychology of the Unconscious was the shaft of the tree—this work is its ample spread."

"For practical psychologists it must assuredly be regarded as the foundation of the science, for in no other work do we find basic psychological principles whose validity is commensurate with the undeniable facts of man’s historic development and the realities of individual experience."


(From Translator's Preface)

"I've never known anything that is was as illuminating as that book was. Suddenly we got tools to work with, instead of exterminating each other, while we could understand much better why we were the way we were and why we came on as we did come on and so forth...
It was enormously helpful"
(Joe Wheelwright)

"It was a revelation. It was absolutely revolutionary in our lives" (Jane Wheelwright)

Readability Information

603 pages divided into 11 chapters of varying length, in turn divided into numerous subsections, plus 22 pages of Translator's Preface, 2 pages of Foreword, 6 pages of Introduction and 11 pages of Conclusion. No illustrations in text.
Total: 644 Pages

Lector Recitator’s Readability Rating

Not in regards to Subject Matter or Overall Length, but Structure
(i.e., Division of written material into Chapters/Sections & Subchapters/Subsections and their individual length)

∙ 1/5: Laborious
∙ 2/5: Challenging
3/5: Readable ←
∙ 4/5: Quite Readable
∙ 5/5: Exceedingly Readable

Links

https://archive.org/details/psychological_types/page/n5
«ὁ δὲ ἀνεξέταστος βίος οὐ βιωτὸς ἀνθρώπῳ»/"the unexamined life is not worth living"

(Plato, Apology: 38a. Translated by H. N. Fowler)

Availle
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Post by Availle » January 2nd, 2019, 7:21 pm

Isn't that what the Myers-Briggs types are based on (INTP and stuff)?
Cheers,
Ava.

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AvailleAudio.com

LectorRecitator
Posts: 73
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » January 2nd, 2019, 8:07 pm

Yes, to a considerable degree. Her research into personality began before this study was published. Afterwards, she identified with numerous elements of Jung's theory and acknowledged its incisiveness, even publishing some articles regarding it during the 1920s.

However, she went on developing a framework of her own, differing significantly from Jung's in specific aspects, yet the larger part of it was based on his writings.
«ὁ δὲ ἀνεξέταστος βίος οὐ βιωτὸς ἀνθρώπῳ»/"the unexamined life is not worth living"

(Plato, Apology: 38a. Translated by H. N. Fowler)

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