Schopenhauer (1914) by Beer, Margrieta & Schopenhauer (1909) by Whittaker, Thomas [Philosophy]

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LectorRecitator
Posts: 29
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » November 14th, 2018, 10:06 am

Details

∙ Title: Schopenhauer
∙ Author/Editor: Beer, Margrieta (1871–1951) M. A.
∙ Publisher: T.C. & E.C. Jack
∙ Date/Edition/Impression: 1914

Description

A short study examining Schopenhauer's life and work

"Schopenhauer differs from most other philosophers in that he has influenced not only the development of the history of thought, the course along which modern philosophy has proceeded, but in that his views have been welcomed as an inspiration, accepted almost in the spirit of a religious faith by workers in quite other departments of life.
No philosopher has so directly touched and influenced the great art movements of modern times. It is now nearly one hundred years since the publication of his greatest work, and his philosophy is a more potent and vitalising force to-day than in his own lifetime. It has been a source of inspiration to artists and has directly stimulated their creative activity, probably more than any other abstract system has ever done."


(From Introduction)

Readability Information

79 pages, divided into 4 chapters of moderate length, plus an Introduction of 8 pages.
2 Additional pages of bibliography and 1 illustration out of text also included.
Total: 87 pages (Bibliography excluded)

(Suitable for Novice/Solo Readers)

Lector Recitator’s Readability Rating

Not in regards to Subject Matter or Overall Length, but Structure
(i.e., Division of written material into Chapters/Sections & Subchapters/Subsections and their individual length.)

∙ 1/5: Laborious
∙ 2/5: Challenging
∙ 3/5: Readable
4/5: Quite Readable ←
∙ 5/5: Exceedingly Readable

Links

https://archive.org/details/schopenhauer00beeriala/page/n5

www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/47136
Last edited by LectorRecitator on December 3rd, 2018, 5:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
«ὁ δὲ ἀνεξέταστος βίος οὐ βιωτὸς ἀνθρώπῳ»/"the unexamined life is not worth living"

(Plato, Apology: 38a. Translated by H. N. Fowler)

LectorRecitator
Posts: 29
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » November 14th, 2018, 10:30 am

Details

∙ Title: Schopenhauer
∙ Author/Editor: Whittaker, Thomas (1856–1935)
∙ Publisher: Archibald Constable & Co Ltd/Dodge Publishing Company
∙ Date/Edition/Impression: 1909

Description

A brief study examining Schopenhauer's life and work.

"Arthur Schopenhauer may be distinctively described as the greatest philosophic writer of his century. So evident is this that he has sometimes been regarded as having more importance in literature than in philosophy; but this is an error. As a metaphysician he is second to no one since Kant. Others of his age have surpassed him in system and in comprehensiveness; but no one has had a firmer grasp of the essential and fundamental problems of philosophy. On the theory of knowledge, the nature of reality, and the meaning of the beautiful and the good, he has solutions to offer that are all results of a characteristic and original way of thinking."

(From Chapter 1)

Readability Information

92 pages divided into 6 relatively short chapters, plus 2 pages of recommendations for further reading entitled "Selected Works". No illustrations.
Total: 92 Pages ("Selected Works" Excluded)

(Suitable for Novice/Solo Readers)

Lector Recitator’s Readability Rating

Not in regards to Subject Matter or Overall Length, but Structure
(i.e., Division of written material into Chapters/Sections & Subchapters/Subsections and their individual length.)

∙ 1/5: Laborious
∙ 2/5: Challenging
∙ 3/5: Readable
4/5: Quite Readable ←
∙ 5/5: Exceedingly Readable

Links

https://archive.org/details/schopenhauer00whitrich/page/n7

https://archive.org/details/schopenhauer00whitiala/page/n5

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/38283
«ὁ δὲ ἀνεξέταστος βίος οὐ βιωτὸς ἀνθρώπῳ»/"the unexamined life is not worth living"

(Plato, Apology: 38a. Translated by H. N. Fowler)

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