The Philosophy Of Immanuel Kant (1919) by Lindsay, Alexander Dunlop [Philosophy]

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LectorRecitator
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Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » November 8th, 2018, 9:38 am

Details

∙ Title: The Philosophy Of Immanuel Kant
∙ Author/Editor: Lindsay, Alexander Dunlop (1879–1952), Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow
∙ Publisher: T. C. & E. C. Jack, Ltd
∙ Date/Edition/Impression: 1919

NOTE: If one compares the contents of both versions of 1913 & 1919 one gets the impression of the latter being an enlarged edition. However I presume it is due to stretching of the text in the latter one and that both impressions are identical in context, but I might be wrong. The one available at Project Gutenberg is the 1913 edition. The attached copy is the 1919 version, which I believe it is prudent to be the one that gets recorded, just to be on the safe side, since it is larger.

Description

A brief examination of Kant’s philosophical thought.
The author focuses strictly on the Three Critiques and from these he pinpoints essential aspects, which he subsequently examines one by one accordingly in 7 chapters.
A well written introductory study, worth recording.

"There is a story that Schopenhauer used to begin his lectures on Kant by saying: "Let no one tell you what is contained in the Critique of Pure Reason." The writer of this little book hopes that no one will imagine that he has disregarded this warning. There are no short-cuts to the understanding of a great philosopher, and the only way to appreciate the greatness of a philosophic system is to study the philosopher's own writings. All that the writer of a book like this can hope to do is to persuade others to undertake that study by interesting them in the problems with which it deals, and by offering a few suggestions which may help to an understanding of it. I have said nothing about the numerous other works which Kant wrote. For the three Critiques contain his system, and the understanding of that is all-important."

(Foreword of the Book)

Readability Information

115 pages long, divided into 7 brief chapters, plus 1 page of Foreword and 1 page of Bibliography worth reading.
1 illustration out of text.
Total: 117 pages.

(Suitable for Novice/Solo Readers)

Lector Recitator’s Readability Rating

Not in regards to Subject Matter or Overall Length, but Structure
(i.e., Division of written material into Chapters/Sections & Subchapters/Subsections and their individual length.)

∙ 1/5: Laborious
∙ 2/5: Challenging
∙ 3/5: Readable
4/5: Quite Readable ←
∙ 5/5: Exceedingly Readable

Links

https://archive.org/details/philosophykand00linduoft/page/n7
Last edited by LectorRecitator on December 5th, 2018, 9:07 am, edited 16 times in total.
«ὁ δὲ ἀνεξέταστος βίος οὐ βιωτὸς ἀνθρώπῳ»/"the unexamined life is not worth living"

(Plato, Apology: 38a. Translated by H. N. Fowler)

ColleenMc
Posts: 502
Joined: April 9th, 2017, 5:57 pm

Post by ColleenMc » November 10th, 2018, 10:05 am

I do like your readability scale!

LectorRecitator
Posts: 29
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » November 10th, 2018, 10:54 am

Thank you, I hope it will prove helpful for aspiring readers.
Last edited by LectorRecitator on November 26th, 2018, 5:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
«ὁ δὲ ἀνεξέταστος βίος οὐ βιωτὸς ἀνθρώπῳ»/"the unexamined life is not worth living"

(Plato, Apology: 38a. Translated by H. N. Fowler)

Elizabby
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Joined: April 1st, 2011, 5:36 pm
Location: Kelsingra

Post by Elizabby » November 12th, 2018, 1:32 am

7 relatively short chapters would make a good solo, maybe even a first solo. I was looking for a group project, but this is a bit short to work well for a group.

Foon
Posts: 1818
Joined: May 10th, 2018, 2:33 pm

Post by Foon » November 18th, 2018, 2:08 pm

This looks interesting! I like reading philosophy books. :) It might still be a good idea to find a different version though, since this one has some damages that makes the text illegible here and there (for example, some tape(?) on p.32/33).
I'm deep into a solo at the moment, but I'll keep this one in mind, if no one takes it up in the mean time. :)
Foon - Please correct my pronunciation!

Readers needed:
Arabian Nights (Vol. 10)

PL needed:
Swanhilde (section 8)

LectorRecitator
Posts: 29
Joined: October 6th, 2018, 1:34 pm

Post by LectorRecitator » November 18th, 2018, 5:18 pm

Most titles in the "The People's Books" series were initially published between 1912–1914.
Some of them were revised later on and released anew with the indication "Revised Edition", as was the case with Professor Taylor's Aristotle:

(1912) https://archive.org/details/aristotle00tayliala/page/n5

(1919) https://archive.org/details/aristotle00tayluoft/page/n9

In Lindsay's case, noticing a later publication date together with alterations in contents and length –despite lacking any indications of a revised or enlarged edition– made me cautious that this might be the case as well.

However, one copy from 1920 displays contents identical with the 1913 version.

(1920) https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.95944/page/n5

(1913) https://archive.org/details/philosophyofimma00linduoft/page/n7

Therefore, as I stated in my initial post both versions are most probably identical in content, but it would be prudent of whoever deciding to record this one to go through a detailed check in advance, just in case.
«ὁ δὲ ἀνεξέταστος βίος οὐ βιωτὸς ἀνθρώπῳ»/"the unexamined life is not worth living"

(Plato, Apology: 38a. Translated by H. N. Fowler)

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