The Art Worldly Wisdom by Balthasar Gracian1601-1658

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soupy
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Post by soupy » February 18th, 2018, 6:18 pm

The Art Worldly Wisdom by Balthasar Gracian1601-1658 Translated From the Spanish by Joseph Jacobs (1892, 1904) 1854-1916
Baltasar Gracián, was a Spanish Jesuit and baroque prose writer and philosopher. He was born in Belmonte, near Calatayud (Aragon). His writings were lauded by Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. Wikipedia


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltasar_Graci%C3%A1n
https://archive.org/details/artofworldlywisd00gracuoft
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Jacobs

From the Introduction:
We may certainly say of Gracian what Heine by an amiable fiction said of himself: he was one of the first men of his century.

Many men have sought to give their views about man and about life in a pithy way; a few have tried to advise men in short sentences what to do in the various emergencies of life. The former have written aphorisms, the latter maxims. Where the aphorism states a fact of human nature, a maxim advises a certain course of action. The aphorism is written in the indicative, the maxim in an imperative mood.

Maxims
Everything is at its Acme; especially the art of making one's way in the world. There is more required nowadays to make a single wise man than formerly to make Seven Sages, and more is needed nowadays to deal with a single person than was required with a whole people in former times.

Knowledge and Courage are the elements of Greatness. They give immortality, because they are immortal. Each is as much as he knows, and the wise can do anything. A man without knowledge, a world without light. Wisdom and strength, eyes and hands. Knowledge without courage is sterile.

Cultivate those who can teach you. Let friendly intercourse be a school of knowledge, and culture be taught through conversation: thus you make your friends your teachers and mingle the pleasures of conversation with the advantages of instruction. Sensible persons thus enjoy alternating pleasures: they reap applause for what they say, and gain instruction from what they hear. We are always attracted to others by our own interest.
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
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