The Enormous Room by e. e. cummings

Suggest and discuss books to read (all languages welcome!)
Post Reply
Cloud Mountain
Posts: 4112
Joined: June 30th, 2006, 8:42 pm
Location: Jersey Shore, N.
Contact:

Post by Cloud Mountain » July 25th, 2006, 10:42 pm

E. E. Cumming's The Enormous Room.

It is not an easy one, but it appears to be the only substantial thing of his in the public domain. That it is in the public domain shows its considered relative non-importance in his corpus. I believe the long-lived Modern Library edition is no longer in print.

THE TEXT
Wikipedia's Thoughts
A little shown/know side of him: HIS ART

BTW: His name was never written in all lower case. Never entered his mind. It's been a literary myth for years, sustained by presumptuous (but loving) admirers. He always signed his name with a large uppercase "E," as in the Greek alphabet followed again with the same for his middle initial, and finishing off with another single letter that was not simply a capital "C," but a "C' with a tail on it, signifying imaginably a combined "C" and lowercase "g." (3 EXAMPLES)
[url=http://librivox.org/newcatalog/people_public.php?peopleid=254]Alan's LV catalog[/url]

fae
Posts: 698
Joined: July 15th, 2006, 4:29 pm
Location: Sunny & Bug-ridden Florida, USA

Post by fae » July 26th, 2006, 9:09 am

ooh e.e. cummings :o

i hadn't realised anything of his was in the p.d.! it hasn't even been 45 years since his death i don't think?

you are right about the text though, it is a bit abstract. how would you break it up? or are you going to do a solo?

btw
not simply a capital "C," but a "C' with a tail on it, signifying imaginably a combined "C" and lowercase "g."
it's a very lazy signature of cummings: capital 'c', line for 'ummin', and the 'tail' being an impression of a lower case 'g'. sometimes he took the trouble to add the final lower case 's'.

Cloud Mountain
Posts: 4112
Joined: June 30th, 2006, 8:42 pm
Location: Jersey Shore, N.
Contact:

Post by Cloud Mountain » July 26th, 2006, 11:54 am

yes, i had forgotten that. i have two of his signatures and i see one has the "s" and one not.

As for how to do it, that's the challenge. i would care to do it on my own, so i'm just putting out feelers, to see if there would be peoples versed in the various languages he used before beginning the task. a teem effort. maybe also, one person doing only the voice of a particular person. the book'd have to be thoroughly analyzed first. interested?

fae
Posts: 698
Joined: July 15th, 2006, 4:29 pm
Location: Sunny & Bug-ridden Florida, USA

Post by fae » July 26th, 2006, 8:33 pm

interested?

hmm, let me think...cummings is one of my favorite all around artists of the 29th century...hmm...
er--yeah!
i've never done any recording (no equiptment either) but i do know a bit about languages - i can speak 2 natively and add 2 more brokenly so that would help.
let me re-read this book since i think it was sometime back in the dark ages that i first picked it up and (shame) never finished reading. i really prefer his poems; too bad they aren't p.d.

Cori
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 11768
Joined: November 22nd, 2005, 10:22 am
Location: Great Britain
Contact:

Post by Cori » May 1st, 2012, 11:14 am

This is available on Gutenberg here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/8446
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

BellonaTimes
Posts: 3684
Joined: February 15th, 2009, 6:25 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Post by BellonaTimes » May 2nd, 2012, 7:35 pm

There are also a few of his early poems in 8 Harvard Poets, which was added to PG I think last fall. Really surprised no one has tackled the memoir yet.
They call me Threadkiller.
My Catalog Page

Elizabby
Posts: 6544
Joined: April 1st, 2011, 5:36 pm
Location: Kelsingra

Post by Elizabby » September 6th, 2017, 6:17 am

This is an autobiographical book by the poet e. e. cummings, describing his imprisonment in France during WWI.
Cummings thus spent over four months in the prison. He met a number of interesting characters and had many picaresque adventures, which he compiled into The Enormous Room. The book is written as a mix between Cummings' well-known unconventional grammar and diction and the witty voice of a young Harvard-educated intellectual in an absurd situation.

The title of the book refers to the large room where Cummings slept beside thirty or so other prisoners. However, it also serves as an allegory for Cummings' mind and his memories of the prison – such that when he describes the many residents of his shared cell, they still live in the "enormous room" of his mind. (from Wikipedia)
I'm surprised we don't have this book already, and I'm full up at the moment or I'd BC it myself! But I offer here the PG link in hopes that someone else will be interested in it: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/8446

Post Reply