Cookery books and books on food.

Suggest and discuss books to read (all languages welcome!)
kayray
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 11832
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 9:10 am
Location: Union City, California
Contact:

Post by kayray » September 26th, 2008, 8:39 am

Yes, it's fun to puzzle out! And the Gutenberg text has a million footnotes.
Kara
http://kayray.org/
--------
"Mary wished to say something very sensible into her Zoom H2 Handy Recorder, but knew not how." -- Jane Austen (& Kara)

hugh
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 8033
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 4:14 am
Location: Montreal, QC
Contact:

Post by hugh » September 26th, 2008, 8:49 am

i took a course in college on chaucer & sir gawain... and the prof used to read it out aloud in funny middle english... encouraged us all to do the same. it's fun once you get the hang of it ;-)

Jc
Posts: 3542
Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 10:25 pm
Location: Montreal, Qc, Canada

Post by Jc » September 26th, 2008, 12:05 pm

One wouldn't think they'd need a recipe to bake beans...
Take benes and seeþ hem and grynde hem in a morter and drawe hem
up with gode broth an do Oynouns in the broth grete mynced an
do þerto and colour it with Safroun and serve it forth.
All of a sudden, my little bro's English doesn't seem so bad...
Put yourself in the Readers' Accents Table. See this post.
(Busy real life & traveling, sorry if not here often.)

kayray
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 11832
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 9:10 am
Location: Union City, California
Contact:

Post by kayray » September 26th, 2008, 12:11 pm

Take Connynges smyte hem to pecys. parboile hem and drawe hem with a
gode broth with almandes blanched and brayed. do þerinne sugur and
powdour gynger and boyle it and the flessh þerwith. flour it with
sugur and with powdour gynger an serue forth.
Next time I cook rabbit, I will smite them to pieces! And when they're done I will serve them forth. Utterly charming.
Kara
http://kayray.org/
--------
"Mary wished to say something very sensible into her Zoom H2 Handy Recorder, but knew not how." -- Jane Austen (& Kara)

hefyd
Posts: 1319
Joined: January 27th, 2007, 6:43 am
Location: UK. Accent : gorblimey, with scouse highlights.

Post by hefyd » March 17th, 2009, 6:55 am

Sir Kenelm Digby [1603 - 1665] is quite a discovery
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenelm_Digby
and when I find the right thing to read, I'll put him up.
The only book of his on Gutenberg is a book of recipes
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16441/16441-8.txt
but he wrote other things, and I believe kept a journal.hefyd
meum est propositum,in taberna mori
ut sint vina proxima,morientis ori
anon.

hefyd
Posts: 1319
Joined: January 27th, 2007, 6:43 am
Location: UK. Accent : gorblimey, with scouse highlights.

Post by hefyd » March 17th, 2009, 7:08 am

His memoirs are on the internet archive
http://www.archive.org/details/privatememoirsof00digbuoft
hefyd
meum est propositum,in taberna mori
ut sint vina proxima,morientis ori
anon.

kmerline
Posts: 8127
Joined: January 8th, 2007, 9:43 pm
Location: Madison, WI

Post by kmerline » March 17th, 2009, 12:25 pm

I really enjoyed the Wikipedia article! You can post works from internet archive without using the (poor) OCR image. There are several such works up on our forums now.

litmuspaper
Posts: 4
Joined: March 22nd, 2009, 10:16 pm
Location: Dou Liou, Taiwan
Contact:

Post by litmuspaper » March 23rd, 2009, 12:02 am

I was surprised to find this. I am currently reading "The Island of the Day Before" in English translation by Umberto Eco, and it is clearly Digby that the character "d'Igby" is based on; he talks about a powder of sympathy as related to healing sword wounds. You learn something every day!

Steampunk
Posts: 2470
Joined: January 23rd, 2008, 1:41 pm
Location: Exile

Post by Steampunk » March 23rd, 2009, 7:16 am

The wikipedia article mentiones in passing that the Powder of Sympathy was suggested in 1687 as a means of solving the longitude problem. Basically the idea was to cut a dog with a knife, then put him aboard a ship. At noon (London time) every day the Powder would be applied to the knife, and the dog would yelp in sympathy--however far away. Thus letting the ship's captain know the time difference between where he was and London, and thus be able to calculate the longitude.

Weird, huh? :)

While not nearly the centerpoint of the book, this "method," among others more and less scientific, is described in Dava Sobel's wonderful book Longitude.


Jim

lectorinfabula
Posts: 46
Joined: June 22nd, 2009, 8:47 am
Location: rural Switzerland

Post by lectorinfabula » August 27th, 2009, 5:36 pm

Fellow Librivoxees
I for one love to listen to audiobooks (mostly Librivox, of course) while either cooking, eating or doing the dishes (and having a smoke aftwerwards)

So, how about a cook book for a change ?

British Librivoxers may be familiar with this one, apparenty this is a classic in the field, not just for the cooking but also for historical, cultural and literary reasons.

The Art Of Cookery Made Plain And Easy, by Hannah Glasse from 1784 [adopted]
http://www.archive.org/details/artcookerymadep00glasgoog

Who needs Jamie Oliver and all those other TV chefs when you got this classic ? Anybody with me here ?

lector in fabula
Talk Minus Action Equals Zero
- D.O.A.

BellonaTimes
Posts: 3680
Joined: February 15th, 2009, 6:25 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Post by BellonaTimes » August 27th, 2009, 8:08 pm

I stumbled across one of these on PG for the Australian crowd from the late 19th Century. It was like the early 1800's homemaking book currently being done.
They call me Threadkiller.
My Catalog Page

RuthieG
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 22046
Joined: April 17th, 2008, 8:41 am
Location: Kent, England
Contact:

Post by RuthieG » August 28th, 2009, 1:02 am

Not an easy read, though. 400 pages of the long 's'. I think I'll stick with the goodly Mrs Beeton for the moment. ;)

Ruth
My LV catalogue page | RuthieG's CataBlog of recordings | Tweet: @RuthGolding

BellonaTimes
Posts: 3680
Joined: February 15th, 2009, 6:25 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Post by BellonaTimes » September 17th, 2009, 5:56 pm

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29982/29982-h/29982-h.htm [adopted]
Culture and Cooking, by Catherine Owen (1881)

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/29970 Twenty-four Little French Dinners and How to Cook and Serve Them by Cora Moore

The former (as the author states) is not so much a cookbook as a general guide with anecdotes.

Maybe a certain admin can record the second book as a solo and simultaneously blog about it -- call it Cori & Cora ala Julie Powell http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julie_Powell! ;)
They call me Threadkiller.
My Catalog Page

Cori
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 11999
Joined: November 22nd, 2005, 10:22 am
Location: Great Britain
Contact:

Post by Cori » September 18th, 2009, 4:23 am

Catherine sounds like a giggle:
CHAPTER VII. FRYING:
Why you fail.
Cora's got some splendid desserts - but the preparing of deceased animals and fish wouldn't happen in my kitchen ... it's as much as I can do to open tins of catfood for the furry kids. However, perhaps it could be run like the Knitting project where people volunteer for a section, and do actually prepare the meal, and then supplement the final recording with pictures of the table and perhaps dinner guests' reviews. (Obviously, not as part of the chapter-file, but extra to it.)
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

RuthieG
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 22046
Joined: April 17th, 2008, 8:41 am
Location: Kent, England
Contact:

Post by RuthieG » September 18th, 2009, 5:46 am

This particular admin is barely able to resist Catherine's book. Culture is sadly lacking in my kitchen, and it's time that was changed! :twisted:

I am also obliged to cook dead animals for my carnivorous husband and son.

Ruth
My LV catalogue page | RuthieG's CataBlog of recordings | Tweet: @RuthGolding

Post Reply