Book suggestions in languages other than English

Suggest and discuss books to read (all languages welcome!)
RuthieG
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Post by RuthieG » April 25th, 2010, 2:10 pm

Well, the first thing will be to find books in Hindi that are in the public domain in the USA, which is where all our audio files are hosted. Effectively, this means published before 1923. The text must also be in the Public Domain in the country of the person who records it. If India, it means that the death of the author must be before 1950.

Do you have any knowledge of where there may be such texts? Our main sources for online texts are Project Gutenberg (which has no Hindi texts at all) and the Internet Archive. There may be Hindi texts there, but I wouldn't know how to look for them. :(

Ruth
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tracykim
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Post by tracykim » June 24th, 2010, 10:53 pm

I think it would be great to add books in Korean, either books translated from another language or by Korean authors. What exactly does the copy wright need to be for that? For example, brothers karamazov is fine in terms of copyright but does that also extend to the translated versions?

Availle
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Post by Availle » June 25th, 2010, 12:06 am

Hi Tracy and welcome to Librivox!

Books in Korean are a great idea! The rules for texts in Korean are:

- publication date BEFORE 1923 (to comply with Librivox/American copyright)
- Author (and Translator) must be dead for at least 50 years, that is, must have died BEFORE 1960. (to comply with Korean copyright rules - I assume you are in Korea, right?)

I think Korean authors would be a wonderful idea... You could start with some short works in Korean if you like, there's a 'multilingual poetry collection' here: http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=23921
and a 'Multilingual Fairy Tale Collection' here: http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=25795

Have fun on here!
Cheers,
Ava.

--
AvailleAudio.com

Kaviraf
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Post by Kaviraf » December 22nd, 2010, 8:36 am

It will be fine to add some armenian books such as novels poetry, artistical works and so on... readen either in armenian or english or french language.

They are so many beautiful masterpiece ou all simply contes that we have to share them ..

Kaviraf

Prajwol
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Post by Prajwol » January 9th, 2011, 10:24 am

Hi my native language is nepali.If you plan any project with that language I will be happy to help you.I can translate nepali hindi and english.
:D
PRAJWOL

frank k
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Post by frank k » January 13th, 2011, 10:10 am

I'm hoping to add Pali to the list of languages of recorded works. This is the language [close to] what the Buddha spoke 2600 years ago. I noticed Max Muller's Dhammapada English translation is in librivox's catalog, I'm hoping to see other works from the Buddhist Canon recorded in Pali to go along with English.

I read through most of the FAQ's, I'm not clear on how to officially get the copyright info on the Buddhist Canon (in Pali). It was originally spoken by the Buddha 2600 years ago, transmitted by spoken language, and not committed to writing on banana leaf etchings until a few hundred years later. Obviously this all took place long before 1923. It's not on Gutemburg, what do I need to do to clear that hurdle and start recording Pali recitations from the Buddhist Canon? Here's an example of one discourse from the Canon (tipitika): http://studies.worldtipitaka.org/tipitaka/9M/1/1.4 (to see what Pali written text looks like).

This page has Pali chanting mp3 files by Thai forest buddhist monks http://www.abhayagiri.org/main/media/#chanting

I'd appreciate any help on how to officially have librivox recognize public domain status of the Buddhist Canon in Pali.

Cori
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Post by Cori » January 16th, 2011, 4:49 am

I replied in your other topic, Frank. In short, we need a printed version dated from before 1923 for any book we record here. Sometimes, because of US copyright law, books first published in the US between 1923 and 1962 are also public domain. But that won't apply to books published anywhere else in the world in that time. :(
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » January 27th, 2011, 12:31 am

I was browsing the Gutenberg listing and found what looks like a Dutch vegetarian cook book:

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/25139

Any takers?
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

Starlite
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Post by Starlite » January 27th, 2011, 4:03 am

Peter Why wrote:I was browsing the Gutenberg listing and found what looks like a Dutch vegetarian cook book:

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/25139

Any takers?

Wow I recognize dishes I grew up with! I especially love this one:
R. 565. Oliebollen. Men beslaat 500 gram tarwebloem, 300 gram [184]krenten, 200 gram rozijnen, 6 à 8 eieren, waarvan men de dooiers en het wit afzonderlijk stijfgeklopt heeft, met lauwwarm water en een weinig opgeloste gist tot een behoorlijke dikte. Tot het bakken gebruikt men zuivere raapolie, die men alvorens met een snede roggebrood uitgebraden heeft.
Esther (of course I can't actually pronounce all the ingredients but I know what Oliebollen are! Imagine an apple fritter.)
"Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world. Unreasonable
people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress,
therefore, depends on unreasonable people." George Bernard Shaw

annise
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Post by annise » January 27th, 2011, 4:11 am

Just so you all can go and cook them - Google translation follows -
Donuts. It comprises 500 grams of wheat flour, 300 grams [184] currants, raisins 200 grams, 6 to 8 eggs, from which the yolks and whites separately beaten form, in a little lukewarm water and dissolved yeast to a proper thickness. Used to baking with pure rapeseed oil, which can cut before a rye bread has been baking.
:help:

Starlite
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Post by Starlite » January 27th, 2011, 4:26 am

Thanks Anne but I have my own recipe for it. It is traditional to make them on New Year's Eve and I have been doing so for the past 22 years though last New years eve, I arrived at my new home with a Uhaul at 8 pm so no baking! :mrgreen:

Esther
"Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world. Unreasonable
people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress,
therefore, depends on unreasonable people." George Bernard Shaw

kattekliek
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Post by kattekliek » January 27th, 2011, 8:46 am

Peter Why wrote:I was browsing the Gutenberg listing and found what looks like a Dutch vegetarian cook book:

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/25139

Any takers?
Haha, no thanks (though I am an almost fulltime vegetarian, and like ‘oliebollen’ too) :D But I’ll copy this suggestion into the dedicated Dutch thread for new ideas; perhaps someone else will pick it up.
Do you live in Europe, Canada, Australia, ... any country where death date of author determines if a book is in the Public Domain? Come to legamus.eu to record books published in 1923 or later, written by authors dead since >70 years!

Nullifidian
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Post by Nullifidian » March 6th, 2011, 9:34 am

I've been reading Roger Shattuck's cultural history of the turn-of-the-century French avant garde entitled The Banquet Years and it's making me think of how nice it would be to have Apollinaire's breakthrough work Alcools in the catalog. We have two poems of his already, both from Alcools, but not the whole work. I don't trust my own French pronunciation, but I'm hoping that one or a few of LV's readers who is (or are) comfortable with French would be willing to take it on. Sadly, the English speaking world was slow to appreciate literary figures like Apollinaire, Jarry, etc. so I'm not having any success finding PD English translations of their work. :(

Alcools was published in 1913, and Apollinaire tragically died five years later during the great flu pandemic, so his work is PD for anyone, even in Life + 70 countries.

Gutenberg has an e-text here (there are also scans on Archive.org):
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/15462

ezwa
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Post by ezwa » March 6th, 2011, 4:48 pm

Nullifidian wrote:Alcools was published in 1913, and Apollinaire tragically died five years later during the great flu pandemic, so his work is PD for anyone, even in Life + 70 countries.

Hello Nullifidian,

Note that Guillaume Apollinaire is one of the author who is "mort pour la France" (died for France), so his works have an extended copyrights' period in that country, which makes it not yet PD in France, as far as I can tell.

PS : I have Alcools somewhere on my "to record" list, so I might get to it someday.
Ezwa

« Heureux qui... sait d'une voix légère passer du grave au doux, du plaisant au sévère »
Boileau


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neckertb
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Post by neckertb » March 11th, 2011, 1:58 pm

Ezwa, just to get this straight (I still don't get that rule): you could record him and so could I, unless I'm visiting my family, right? Most of the French speaking people we have around here do not live in France, actually (I realised the other day) :D
Nadine

Les enfants du capitaine Grant

Live in a death + 70 country? Have a look at Legamus

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