Request for more LGBT content

Suggest and discuss books to read (all languages welcome!)
bhavya
Posts: 1071
Joined: May 4th, 2018, 1:46 am
Location: St Andrews

Post by bhavya » April 15th, 2019, 5:28 am

HoosierMary wrote:
November 4th, 2014, 9:15 pm
A few thoughts:

Browsing this thread, my mind kept going back to Well of Loneliness (Radclyffe Hall), but I was dismayed to find it was published in 1928.
So I am not sure if you know about this book, but here is the book that is said to have inspired Hall in writing his book:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/40264/40264-h/40264-h.htm

bhavya
Posts: 1071
Joined: May 4th, 2018, 1:46 am
Location: St Andrews

Post by bhavya » April 15th, 2019, 5:33 am

Again, I am not sure if this has been discovered,

but this book gives a list of books that deal with lesbian relationships. At first glance, most of the books will not be in PD for a long, looong time. But, there are some that might be released shortly ( in a few years :wink: ) !

some which are in pd ( I would still need to search for sources ) are:
  • HUNEKER, JAMES. Painted Veils. Liveright 1920 (still in print); pbr Avon 1928. Unpleasant novel of the theatrical and literary world of that day; the heroine, Easter, (an opera singer) has a mannish satellite.

    The Quest. Macmillan, 1922. An over-emotional girl, seeking escape from home tensions, develops crushes on a classmate and on a teacher. her mother’s over-reaction turns the girl against variant attachments just as her
    30
     unhappy home turned her against marriage.

    The Labyrinth. Macmillan, 1923. Variant attachments, among others, in a novel of a woman unhappy in domesticity and trying to find creative outlets

    MILLAY, KATHLEEN. Against the Wall. Macaulay, 1929. College novel by the sister of the well-known poet (see poetry supplement).

    NEFF, WANDA FRAIKEN. We Sing Diana. Boston, Houghton 1928. Story of a girl too inhibited to face her own nature.

    O’Neill, Rose—The Master Mistress. N. Y. Knopf, 1922. The creator of the “Kewpies” also was the writer of these sensitive, occasionally erotic poems. Perhaps a dozen are explicitly lesbian.
and so on...I will go ahead and search for online sources, if not buy and upload them on PG.

elsieselwyn
Posts: 1617
Joined: March 28th, 2019, 8:37 pm
Location: Ohio, USA

Post by elsieselwyn » April 15th, 2019, 9:18 am

bhavya wrote:
April 15th, 2019, 5:33 am
Again, I am not sure if this has been discovered,

but this book gives a list of books that deal with lesbian relationships. At first glance, most of the books will not be in PD for a long, looong time. But, there are some that might be released shortly ( in a few years :wink: ) !

some which are in pd ( I would still need to search for sources ) are:
  • HUNEKER, JAMES. Painted Veils. Liveright 1920 (still in print); pbr Avon 1928. Unpleasant novel of the theatrical and literary world of that day; the heroine, Easter, (an opera singer) has a mannish satellite.

    The Quest. Macmillan, 1922. An over-emotional girl, seeking escape from home tensions, develops crushes on a classmate and on a teacher. her mother’s over-reaction turns the girl against variant attachments just as her
    30
     unhappy home turned her against marriage.

    The Labyrinth. Macmillan, 1923. Variant attachments, among others, in a novel of a woman unhappy in domesticity and trying to find creative outlets

    MILLAY, KATHLEEN. Against the Wall. Macaulay, 1929. College novel by the sister of the well-known poet (see poetry supplement).

    NEFF, WANDA FRAIKEN. We Sing Diana. Boston, Houghton 1928. Story of a girl too inhibited to face her own nature.

    O’Neill, Rose—The Master Mistress. N. Y. Knopf, 1922. The creator of the “Kewpies” also was the writer of these sensitive, occasionally erotic poems. Perhaps a dozen are explicitly lesbian.
and so on...I will go ahead and search for online sources, if not buy and upload them on PG.

Painted Veils is at gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/47141

The Labyrinth on archive: https://archive.org/details/labyrinth00hull/page/n9

Various copies are available on archive of the master mistress:
https://archive.org/details/mastermistresspo00oneirich/page/n6
https://archive.org/details/mastermistress00onegoog/page/n6
https://archive.org/details/cu31924021654615/page/n6
https://archive.org/details/mastermistresspo00onei/page/n6

Against the wall on hathi trust (with full view):
https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/006702671

Elizabby
Posts: 9239
Joined: April 1st, 2011, 5:36 pm
Location: Kelsingra

Post by Elizabby » April 15th, 2019, 5:58 pm

bhavya wrote:
April 15th, 2019, 5:28 am
HoosierMary wrote:
November 4th, 2014, 9:15 pm
A few thoughts:

Browsing this thread, my mind kept going back to Well of Loneliness (Radclyffe Hall), but I was dismayed to find it was published in 1928.
So I am not sure if you know about this book, but here is the book that is said to have inspired Hall in writing his book:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/40264/40264-h/40264-h.htm
Looks interesting! I've just launched this project: Regiment of Women. See also the purple link in my signature file.

xios01
Posts: 105
Joined: August 27th, 2017, 7:07 am
Contact:

Post by xios01 » May 6th, 2019, 9:08 am

Odd question for this topic. But has there ever been an LGBT (or related) theme offered for the librivox/archive.org "staff picks" ?? I've not found any related. Albeit, I know that for Librivox this can be a difficult to identify related projects, we do have a few options.

staff picks for 2019:
https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Staff_Picks_2019

staff picks discussions and suggestions:
viewtopic.php?f=24&t=17058&p=1585479&hilit=staff+picks#p1585479

Any thoughts?

Peter Why
Posts: 5048
Joined: November 24th, 2005, 3:54 am
Location: Chigwell (North-East London, U.K.)

Post by Peter Why » March 5th, 2021, 4:06 am

I'm reading a Professor Moriarty novel (by Michael Kurland), where part of the plot line mentions "The Cleveland Street Scandal", which was caused by the discovery of a male brothel in Victorian London. The wikipedia article about the scandal mentioned that the final defence witness, John Saul .... "featured in a clandestinely published erotic novel The Sins of the Cities of the Plain which was cast as his autobiography." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleveland_Street_scandal

I found that Gutenberg had a copy: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/53964 It may be too hot for LibriVox, but with Fanny Hill and Kate Percival on our list, perhaps not. I was wondering whether anyone had read it.


Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

MARTIN GEESON
Posts: 2611
Joined: February 8th, 2009, 11:30 am
Location: Haslemere Surrey UK

Post by MARTIN GEESON » March 9th, 2021, 6:46 pm

Peter,
I must confess that I have skimmed through parts of the work; but the prevailing tone of relentless jollity put me off reading it connectedly.

For some reason, I kept recalling the sublimely naughty sketches featuring Julian and Sandy, in the 1960s BBC radio show 'Round the Horne' (which Internet Archive also preserves for us). There too you're presented with Life lived entirely on the plane of the Facetious, but in the form of brief vignettes.

Alas, Haslemere offers few of the delights of the Cities of the Plain; so perhaps it's time to give the book another go?

Regards, Martin

Peter Why
Posts: 5048
Joined: November 24th, 2005, 3:54 am
Location: Chigwell (North-East London, U.K.)

Post by Peter Why » March 10th, 2021, 1:36 am

I remember Julian and Sandy from my childhood, with a lot of affection. I have a CD collection of their little sketches somewhere.

From my glance at the book, I agree about the jollity; it reminded me a little of the Kate Percival book. It would probably be much too long to read here though ... Kate was too long, too. The listener drowns.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

DACSoft
Posts: 1496
Joined: August 17th, 2013, 8:51 am
Location: Connecticut, US

Post by DACSoft » March 19th, 2021, 12:52 pm

Final update (FYI):

After almost 3 years as a work-in-progress :oops: , I've finally completed this audio project. The audio version can be found at:
https://librivox.org/left-to-themselves-by-edward-irenaeus-stevenson/

Enjoy,

Don
DACSoft wrote:
May 23rd, 2018, 10:10 am
Update (FYI):

I've submitted Left to Themselves to PG last night, and the ebook was posted this morning (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57203).

Having decided to also record this book as a solo for LV, I went ahead and created a new project this morning (viewtopic.php?f=28&t=70401).

Thanks to everyone for your interest,
Don
DACSoft wrote:
February 28th, 2017, 9:45 am
ChuckW wrote:Either way, someone should really do Prime-Stevenson's Left to Themselves as a solo project. It's available online and definitely deserves inclusion on this list, regardless of how "implicit" its central romance might be.
FYI.

I've obtained a copyright clearance for this one and plan to run it through DP and submit the ebook to PG. Once completed, I may solo the project here (and once one of my 2 in-progress projects are completed).

Don
Don (DACSoft)
Bringing the Baseball Joe series to audio!

In Progress:
Baseball Joe in the Big League; Whispering Tongues; The Story My Doggie Told to Me
Next up:
Baseball Joe on the Giants; The Arrival of Jimpson

Elin
Posts: 195
Joined: August 2nd, 2011, 2:18 am
Location: Göteborg, Sweden

Post by Elin » April 11th, 2021, 2:47 am

Oh hey, coincidence! I'm just about to start recording another Edward Prime-Stevenson book:
viewtopic.php?f=28&t=86775

: )

alanine
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Joined: May 3rd, 2021, 9:56 am
Location: Massachusetts
Contact:

Post by alanine » May 7th, 2021, 6:41 pm

I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Jack London short story "The Heathen," published in "South Sea Tales" and apparently done twice (so far) by Librivox, once as part of a solo read of the whole book (https://librivox.org/south-sea-tales-by-jack-london/), and once as part of a short story collection (https://librivox.org/short-story-collection-vol-040-by-various/). It sure reads to me like the tale of a loving gay marriage, though of course the standards of the time required it to be told somewhat obliquely.

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