Surface Tension by Agnes Pockels

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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 4th, 2018, 7:55 am

Here is a suggestion for a short paper written by a pioneering woman scientist, Agnes Pockels. This paper (written as a letter) would be a great fit for the Short Nonfiction Collection, and Pockels is not yet in the LibriVox catalog.

[from Wikipedia] "Agnes Luise Wilhelmine Pockels (February 14, 1862 – November 21, 1935), was a German pioneer in chemistry. Her work was fundamental in establishing the modern discipline known as surface science, which describes the properties of liquid and solid surfaces."

"Pockels was able to measure the surface tension of water by devising an apparatus known as the slide trough, a key instrument in the new discipline of surface science. In 1891, with the help of Lord Rayleigh, Pockels published her first paper, "Surface Tension," on her measurements in the journal Nature."


Here is a link to "Surface Tension" in the journal Nature: https://archive.org/stream/nature12unkngoog#page/n524/mode/1up

And here is a link to the nonfiction collection: viewtopic.php?f=28&t=70109

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » June 18th, 2018, 8:35 pm

Hmm. Very tempting. Adding this to my to do list! (unless, of course, someone else gets to it before me. :wink: )
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 19th, 2018, 3:32 am

I was hoping somebody with a scientific bent might read Pockels' letter in time for the Short Nonfiction Collection Vol. 057, the cover of which I knew was going to feature a reflective bubble, but it would be welcome anytime at SNF. I did the cover first and then was stumped for what to read to go along with it, so I watched an Amazon Prime documentary, The Science of Bubbles, which recreates Agnes Pockels experiments on the surface tension of water. More on giant bubbles here: http://audiobooks.oliveandseablue.com/arts/natureandscience/reflective-bubbles/

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